I’m not the most patriotic person you would see out there; however, I have rather been disappointed lately with how negatively people feel about their countries. Amidst an amusing conversation with a rather like-minded American the other day, I had an epiphany which gave rise to an idea of writing a letter to all those who are amazingly cynical about their countries and its people.

Dear Hatemongers,

I’m hoping that you’re all, assumingly, living a great life here in United States. Yes, I referred to you as hatemongers because your role is no less in spreading xenophobia around the world than all the myopic racists we see out there. “No country is perfect” may seem like the most cliched statement that there is; however, unfortunately, you need to embrace the fact that your countries and their people are not perfect. Using fancy and contemporary words such as “Diversity”, “Acceptance”, and ‘Open-mindedness” may sound cool and feed your self-worthiness too, but you’re clearly doing more damage to the already marred identities of your respective countries. You are the source of hatred and dishonor towards your countries. However terrible the political or administrative conditions are in your country, you need to own it.

Think of your country as your siblings. You love them. You hate them too. Maybe your country is just a sibling who has gone rogue – you’re unable to control its actions but you don’t need to disown it. “I see enough of my people in my country, hence, I’ll stay away from them here” wouldn’t make you different or the odd one. It’s just you becoming more and more narcissistic by shunning your own people. If you can’t like yourself; how can you expect others to like you? You’re out there proclaiming the stigmas about your country and taking pride in saying that you’re not one of them. It’s damaging your people, your country, and the humanity in its entirety.

Let’s pause for a moment and think beyond the geographical man-made boundaries. Let’s not talk about countries and owning their reputations. Let’s talk about bigger things – being global citizens and being human. You talk about diversity, you talk about inclusion; however, let me dare ask you, what kind of diversity is it which highlights feeling shame in spending time around people from your own country? Just like charity, diversity begins at home. Start loving your own people. Take pride in being with them.

Do not spread hate. If you don’t like your country and it’s people, it’s okay. However, do not brutally announce your hatred. I ask you not to be the source of xenophobia. If you believe in diversity, love everyone, not just the educated or seemingly sophisticated people who feed your self-esteem. LOVE EVERYONE!

Be the change you wish to see in this world

With love,
Talha